Pencil and Eraser

I try to make an annual trip to an agricultural fair to sketch, my idea of great fun. Yesterday I was at the Loudonville Street Fair, a delightful event that runs through Saturday, October 7, 2017. I spent a few hours in the morning perched on a tiny stool outside the livestock tent with my small sketchbook, graphite pencil and eraser. My animal models are all groomed and captive…but that does not mean they hold still for their portraits. But, if you settle in quietly and have tons of patience, most animals will relax and move minimally, often returning to the same pose. The eraser is as vital as the pencil. My eraser rubbed out several attempts when my chosen model was too active to draw. The last photo is of one of my models. I am not only waiting for the animal to return to position, I must guess what is behind bars of the pen and under the halter. I became fascinated with the swirls and ridges as the hair direction changed on the steer’s face. I now understand why the term “cowlick” is used for rumpled hair.

Hereford cow

sleeping pig

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Street Fair

Deadlines always motivate me. I am using the opportunity to exhibit with my small local quilt guild at a Street Fair held in the nearest village this coming week. I finished my second entry yesterday. It felt good to be in my studio and productive. Here is Northern Parula, which has my drawing of a small song bird native to our area. The entry I just finished, Life is Sweet, is a rework of the small piece I made and posted about in June. I moderated the color and the added a shortened version of the accompanying poem in the border. Tomorrow I take them to town to exhibit.

Life is Sweet

Northern Parula

Postcard

I learned of a call for entries for an art show which will be on display from October 26th through November 17th, 2017 at the Coburn Art Gallery at Ashland University. The show is called Mail Art. It consists of 4″ x 6″ cards made to fit the theme “Strength in Connection-Thy Neighbor”.  My entry, “Red, Brown, Yellow, Black and White” using 185lb watercolor paper, a Zig memory system writer, inktense pencils, and a clever brush that has water in the handle.Entries must be mailed to the show without an enclosing envelope. It will be interesting to see if my watercolor entry arrives undamaged.

 

I need to be home

I’m not sure what to say because it has been so long since I did a post. I would like to resume regular weekly posts but I have done so much traveling this year, both short and long trips, that I have not made posting on this blog a priority. I love traveling, but I need to be home long enough to assimilate all I’ve seen and done. Here are two photos from Thursday, September 21, 2017, plein air painting at Malabar Farm, an Ohio State park. The painting I did that day needs a bit more polishing before I show a photo of it, but the point of plein air is being outdoors as much as creating a masterpiece.  I love the fall color, which is just beginning in Ohio.

Declaration of Sentiments

I’ve just digitally submitted my two entries for an art quilt exhibition with the lengthy title: Declaration of Sentiments 1848 — The Struggle Continues. This Studio Art Quilt Associates regional show, with the theme of women’s rights, will be a part of the AQS Show in Paducah, KY September 13 -16, 2017. After that, it will travel to other venues until August 2020. The exhibit is juried, so there is no guarantee my two submissions will be chosen from among many other hopeful artist’s entries. Whether they are accepted or not, I have throughly enjoyed the process of making my entries…the research, the problem-solving and the adrenaline rush of beating the entry deadline. Here are my artist’s statements and photos of the works:

Glass Ceiling – Women are not equally represented in positions of power in government or business. Pay inequity persists. Today’s young women must work assertively but peacefully to break the glass ceiling and take their places beside men in the workforce.

Glass Ceiling

(detail) Glass Ceiling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(detail) Glass Ceiling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claiming Power – It took courageous people and many years to claim the rights American women now enjoy. A large figure, representing all women, marches with historic figures who promoted women’s rights. Text from the Declaration of Sentiments conveys the main ideas.

Claiming Power

(detail) Claiming Power

 

(detail) Claiming Power

I AM STILL HERE

I made a fast and fun 12.5″ x 12.5″ quilt…only three days from the idea to the finish. The sketch was made of large simplified shapes. I chose a face, because I have a presentation next week on making art quilts with faces as the subject.

I traced my line drawing onto a piece of fabric in permanent fine line marker.
I gathered bold bright fabrics, digging through boxes of plaids and polka dots.
I worked flat, with my base fabric pinned to a piece of foamcore, glueing my cut fabric shapes to this base with tiny smears of glue in the center of each piece. I pinned together these layers: white tulle with glitter, the fabric collage, a thin batting, and a backing fabric.

I used only two colors of thread to quilt, peach and teal blue. Details were added as I sewed: eyebrows, creases in the hand, including a long life line,  spirals in the cheeks (the symbol of life journey in some cultures). As I got to the nearly- finished stage of sewing on the binding, I composed a poem to explain the quilt’s story. Every quilt has a story.

Here’s the result:

 

Recovering from my Retreat

It may sound a bit odd that I need recovery time after a retreat, but I do. I spend a lovely seven days in Portland, Maine. I went a bit early prior to Susan Carlson’s Monday through Friday class teaching her fabric collage technique. I am a bit sleep deprived. I got up early each morning because I did not want to  miss a thing, but my hotel room faced a lively bar that had music thumping until 1:30 am every night.  Yesterday I spent a really long travel day coming home. I missed and had to reschedule plane connections going to Maine and coming home, but eventually arrived safely each time!

This retreat has been eagerly anticipated. I had spent weeks refining two drawings, then a full day choosing fabrics to take. I was not sure which project option I would choose. I picked the one that I felt would allow me to learn the most: a head and shoulders view of a Toggenburg goat named Cindy.

I had read both of Susan’s books about fabric collage and I had been following her blog for a year, so nothing she presented was a great surprise. It was very useful to practice the technique with input from Susan. She urged me to use colors brighter than I would have otherwise chosen. It took days of practice until I began to select smaller bits of fabric from many sources rather than a larger piece from a single fabric. Generous fellow students helped by donating vivid fabrics that I never would have purchased. Here are photos taken on the first day and fifth day of the retreat. I will have to set the project aside until I finish things that have a June deadline, but I’m keeping this collage project propped up in my studio and will work on it a bit to keep my motivation up.

Cindy on Friday

Cindy on Monday

Teacher Susan Carlson